Design/Brandhorst Museum

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The ‘Brandhorst’ building with its long, two-storey, rectangular structure and multi-coloured facade composed of 36,000 vertical ceramic louvres in 23 different coloured glazes, was created by Sauerbruch Hutton architects. It has three exhibition areas which are connected by stairs. All galleries (with the exception of the Media Suite) have white walls and wooden floorboards of Danish oak.

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Munich 2014

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Centre Pompidou-Metz

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The Centre Pompidou-Metz is a museum of modern and contemporary arts located in Metz, France. It is a branch of Pompidou arts centre of Paris, and features semi-permanent and temporary exhibitions from the large collection of the French National Museum of Modern Art. The Monument was designed by Japanese architect Shigeru Ban. The Centre Pompidou-Metz is a large hexagon structured round a central spire reaching 77 m (253 ft) and possesses three rectangular galleries weaving through the building at different levels. The roof is the major achievement of the building: a 90 m (300 ft) wide hexagon echoing the building’s floor map. The entire wooden structure is covered with a white fibreglass membrane and a coating of teflon, which has the distinction of being self-cleaning, protect from direct sunlight while providing a transparent at night. And last, but not least, the avant-garde roof architecture has inspired quite a few nicknames for the bulding: the most prominent among them ‘Smurf House’ and ‘Chinese Hat’.

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Metz 2014

Centre Georges Pompidou

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Centre Georges Pompidou is a complex in the Beaubourg area of the 4th arrondissement of Paris. It houses the Bibliothèque publique d’information, the Musée National d’Art Moderne and a centre for music and acoustic research.

The centre was designed by the architectural team of Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano, along with Gianfranco Franchini. Initially, all of the functional structural elements of the building were colour-coded: green pipes are plumbing, blue ducts are for climate control, electrical wires are encased in yellow, and circulation elements and devices for safety (e.g., fire extinguishers) are red.

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Paris 2009